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Funding strategy statement

This Funding Strategy Statement (FSS) has been prepared in accordance with Regulation 58 of the Local Government Pension Scheme Regulations 2013 (the Regulations) and describes Kent County Council’s strategy, in its capacity as administering authority, for the funding of the Kent County Council Superannuation Fund (the Fund).

The Fund's employers and the Fund Actuary, Barnett Waddingham LLP , have been consulted on the content of this statement.

This statement should be read in conjunction with the Fund’s Investment Strategy Statement (ISS) and has been prepared with regard to the guidance (Preparing and maintaining a funding strategy statement in the LGPS - 2016 edition) issued by the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (CIPFA).

Purpose of the Funding Strategy Statement

The purpose of this Funding Strategy Statement (FSS) is to:

  • establish a clear and transparent fund-specific strategy which will identify how employers’ pension liabilities are best met going forward
  • support the desirability of maintaining as nearly constant a primary contribution rate as possible, as defined in regulation 62(5) of the regulations
  • ensure that the regulatory requirements to set contributions to meet the future liability to provide scheme member benefits in a way that ensures the solvency and long-term cost efficiency of the Fund are met; and
  • take a prudent longer-term view of funding those liabilities.

Aims and purposes of the Fund

The aims of the Fund are to

  • manage employers’ liabilities effectively and ensure that sufficient resources are available to meet all liabilities as they fall due
  • enable primary contribution rates to be kept as nearly constant as possible and (subject to the administering authority not taking undue risks) at reasonable cost to all relevant parties (such as the taxpayers, scheduled, resolution and admitted bodies), while achieving and maintaining Fund solvency and long-term cost efficiency. This should be assessed in light of the risk profile of the Fund and employers, and the risk appetite of the administering authority and employers alike, and
  • seek returns on investment within reasonable risk parameters.

The purpose of the Fund is to

  • pay pensions, lump sums and other benefits to scheme members as provided under the regulations
  • meet the costs associated in administering the Fund
  • receive contributions, transfer values and investment income.

Funding objectives

Contributions are paid to the Fund by scheme members and the employing bodies to provide for the benefits which will become payable to scheme members when they fall due.

The funding objectives are to:

  • ensure that pension benefits can be met as and when they fall due over the lifetime of the Fund
  • ensure the solvency of the Fund
  • set levels of employer contribution rates to target a 100% funding level over an appropriate time period and using appropriate actuarial assumptions, while taking into account the different characteristics of participating employers
  • build up the required assets in such a way that employer contribution rates are kept as stable as possible, with consideration of the long-term cost efficiency objective, and
  • Adopt appropriate measures and approaches to reduce the risk, as far as possible, to the Fund, other employers and ultimately the taxpayer from an employer defaulting on its pension obligations.

In developing the funding strategy, the administering authority should also have regard to the likely outcomes of the review carried out under Section 13(4)(c) of the Public Service Pensions Act 2013.  Section 13(4)(c) requires an independent review of the actuarial valuations of the LGPS funds; this involves reporting on whether the rate of employer contributions set as part of the actuarial valuations are set at an appropriate level to ensure the solvency of the Fund and the long-term cost efficiency of the Scheme so far as relating to the pension Fund.  The review also looks at compliance and consistency of the actuarial valuations.

Key parties

The key parties involved in the funding process and their responsibilities are:

Funding strategy

The factors affecting the Fund’s finances are constantly changing, so it is necessary for its financial position and the contributions payable to be reviewed from time to time by means of an actuarial valuation to check that the funding objectives are being met.

The most recent actuarial valuation of the Fund was carried out as at 31 March 2019.  The results of the 2019 valuation were:

  • Surplus (deficit) -£129m
  • Funding level 98%.

On a whole Fund level, the primary rate required to cover the employer cost of future benefit accrual was 18.4% of payroll p.a.

The individual employer contribution rates are set out in the Rates and Adjustments Certificate which forms part of the Fund’s 2019 valuation report.

The actuarial valuation involves a projection of future cashflows to and from the Fund.  The main purpose of the valuation is to determine the level of employers’ contributions that should be paid to ensure that the existing assets and future contributions will be sufficient to meet all future benefit payments from the Fund.  A summary of the methods and assumptions adopted is set out in the sections below.

Funding method

The key objective in determining employer contribution rates is to establish a funding target and then set levels of employer contribution to meet that target over an agreed period.

The funding target is to have sufficient assets in the Fund to meet the accrued liabilities for each employer in the Fund.

For all employers, the method adopted is to consider separately the benefits accrued before the valuation date (past service) and benefits expected to be accrued after the valuation date (future service).  These are evaluated as follows:

  • the past service funding level of the Fund. This is the ratio of accumulated assets to liabilities in respect of past service. It makes allowance for future increases to members’ pay and pensions. A funding level in excess of 100% indicates a surplus of assets over liabilities; while a funding level of less than 100% indicates a deficit; and
  • the future service funding rate (also referred to as the primary rate as defined in regulation 62(5) of the regulations) is the level of contributions required from the individual employers which, in combination with employee contributions is expected to cover the cost of benefits accruing in future.

The adjustment required to the primary rate to calculate an employer’s total contribution rate is referred to as the secondary rate, as defined in Regulation 62(7).  Further details of how the secondary rate is calculated for employers is given below in the Deficit recovery/surplus amortisation periods section.

The approach to the primary rate will depend on specific employer circumstances and in particular may depend on whether an employer is an “open” employer – one which allows new recruits access to the Fund, or a “closed” employer – one which no longer permits new staff access to the Fund.  The expected period of participation by an employer in the Fund may also affect the total contribution rate.

For open employers, the actuarial funding method that is adopted is known as the Projected Unit Method.  The key feature of this method is that, in assessing the future service cost, the primary rate represents the cost of one year’s benefit accrual only.

For closed employers, the actuarial funding method adopted is known as the Attained Age Method. The key difference between this method and the Projected Unit Method is that the Attained Age Method assesses the average cost of the benefits that will accrue over a specific period, such as the length of a contract or the remaining expected working lifetime of active members.

The approach by employer may vary to reflect an employer’s specific circumstance, however, in general the closed employers in the Fund are admission bodies who have joined the Fund as part of an outsourcing contract and therefore the Attained Age Method is used in setting their contributions.  All other employers (for example councils, higher education bodies and academies) are generally open employers and therefore the Projected Unit Method is used.  The administering authority holds details of the open or closed status of each employer.

Valuation assumptions and funding model

In completing the actuarial valuation it is necessary to formulate assumptions about the factors affecting the Fund’s future finances such as price inflation, pay increases, investment returns, rates of mortality, early retirement and staff turnover.

The assumptions adopted at the valuation can therefore be considered as:

  • the demographic (or statistical) assumptions which are essentially estimates of the likelihood or timing of benefits and contributions being paid, and
  • the financial assumptions which will determine the estimates of the amount of benefits and contributions payable and their current (or present) value.

Future price inflation

The base assumption in any valuation is the future level of price inflation over a period commensurate with the duration of the liabilities, as measured by the Retail Price Index (RPI).  This is derived using the 20 year point on the Bank of England implied Retail Price Index (RPI) inflation curve, with consideration of the market conditions over the six months straddling the valuation date.  The 20 year point on the curve is taken as 20 years is consistent with the average duration of an LGPS Fund.

This assumption was reviewed following the Chancellor’s November 2020 announcement on the reform of RPI and is now assumed to be 0.4% p.a. lower than the 20 year point on the inflation curve. This change will be reflected in the ongoing funding assumptions with effect from 1 April 2021, with the change smoothed in over the six month period straddling this date. This adjustment accounts for both the shape of the curve in comparison to the Fund’s liability profile and the view that investors are willing to accept a lower return on investments to ensure inflation linked returns.

Future pension increases

Pension increases are linked to changes in the level of the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Inflation as measured by the CPI has historically been less than RPI due mainly to different calculation methods.  At the March 2019 actuarial valuation, a deduction of 1.0% p.a. was made to the RPI assumption to derive the CPI assumption.  The CPI assumption adopted at March 2019 was 2.6% p.a.

This assumption was also reviewed in light of the Chancellor’s announcement on the reform of RPI mentioned above and CPI inflation is now assumed to be 0.4% p.a. lower than the RPI assumption (i.e. a total of 0.8% p.a. below the 20 year point on the Bank of England implied RPI inflation curve). This change will be reflected in the ongoing funding assumptions with effect from 1 April 2021, with the change smoothed in over the six month period straddling this date. This reflects the anticipated reform of RPI inflation from 2030 following the UK Statistics Authority’s proposal to change the RPI calculation method in line with the Consumer Prices Index including Housing costs (CPIH). This assumption will be reviewed at future valuations and the difference between RPI and CPI is expected to move towards 0.0% p.a. as we get closer to 2030.

Future pay increases

As some of the benefits are linked to pay levels at retirement, it is necessary to make an assumption as to future levels of pay inflation. Historically, there has been a close link between price inflation and pay increases with pay increases exceeding price inflation in the longer term. The long-term pay increase assumption adopted as at 31 March 2019 was CPI plus 1% per annum which includes allowance for promotional increases.

Future investment returns/discount rate

To determine the value of accrued liabilities and derive future contribution requirements it is necessary to discount future payments to and from the Fund to present day values.

The discount rate that is adopted will depend on the funding target adopted for each scheme employer.

The discount rate that is applied to all projected liabilities reflects a prudent estimate of the rate of investment return that is expected to be earned from the Fund’s long-term investment strategy by considering average market yields in the six months straddling the valuation date.  The discount rate so determined may be referred to as the “ongoing” discount rate.

It may be appropriate for an alternative discount rate approach to be taken to reflect an individual employer’s situation.  This may be, for example, to reflect an employer targeting a cessation event or to reflect the administering authority’s views on the level of risk that an employer poses to the Fund.  The Fund Actuary will incorporate any such adjustments after consultation with the administering authority.

A summary of the financial assumptions adopted for the 2019 valuation is:

  • RPI inflation is 3.6% per annum
  • CPI inflation is 2.6% per annum
  • Pension and deferred pension increases, and CARE revaluation is in line with CPI inflation
  • Pay increases is CPI inflation + 1% per annum
  • Discount rate is 4.7% per annum.

Asset valuation

For the purpose of the valuation, the asset value used is the market value of the accumulated fund at the valuation date, adjusted to reflect average market conditions during the six months straddling the valuation date.  This is referred to as the smoothed asset value and is calculated as a consistent approach to the valuation of the liabilities.

The Fund’s assets are notionally allocated to employers at an individual level by allowing for actual Fund returns achieved on the assets and cashflows paid into and out of the Fund in respect of each employer (e.g. contributions received and benefits paid.

Demographic assumptions

The demographic assumptions incorporated into the valuation are based on fund-specific experience and national statistics. These are adjusted as appropriate to reflect the individual circumstances of the Fund and/or individual employers.

Further details of all of the assumptions adopted are included in the Fund's 2019 valuation report (PDF, 2.0 MB)

McCloud/Sargeant judgements

The McCloud/Sargeant judgements were in relation to two employment tribunal cases which were brought against the government in relation to possible age and gender discrimination in the implementation of transitional protection following the introduction of the reformed 2015 public service pension schemes from 1 April 2015.  These judgements were not directly in relation to the LGPS, however, do have implications for the LGPS.

In December 2018, the Court of Appeal ruled that the transitional protection offered to some members as part of the reforms amounted to unlawful discrimination.  On 27 June 2019 the Supreme Court denied the government’s request for an appeal in the case.  A remedy is still to be either imposed by the Employment Tribunal or negotiated and applied to all public service schemes, so it is not yet clear how this judgement may affect LGPS members’ past or future service benefits.  It has, however, been noted by government in its 15 July 2019 statement that it expects to have to amend all public service schemes, including the LGPS. On 16 July 2020, the Government published a consultation on the proposed remedy to be applied to LGPS benefits. On 13 May 2021 the Government issued a ministerial statement which confirms that changes will be made to the LGPS Regulations to compensate members directly affected by the change to career average benefits from 1 April 2014. The Government’s intention is that revised regulations will come into force on 1 April 2023, and draft regulations are expected later in 2021.

Further details of this can be found in the Regulatory risks section.

As part of the Fund’s 2019 valuation, in order to mitigate the risk of member benefits being uplifted and becoming more expensive, the potential impact of McCloud was covered by the prudence allowance in the discount rate assumption.  As the remedy is still to be agreed the cost cannot be calculated with certainty, however, the Fund Actuary expects it is likely to be less than 0.05% of the discount rate assumption.

Guaranteed Minimum Pension (GMP) indexation and equalisation

As part of the restructuring of the state pension provision, the government needs to consider how public service pension payments should be increased in future for members who accrued a Guaranteed Minimum Pension (GMP) from their public service pension scheme and expect to reach State Pension Age (SPA) post-December 2018.  In addition, a resulting potential inequality in the payment of public service pensions between men and women needs to be addressed.  Find out about the current method of indexation and equalisation of public service pension schemes

On 23 March 2021, the government published the outcome to its Guaranteed Minimum Pension Indexation consultation, concluding that all public service pension schemes, including the LGPS, will be directed to provide full indexation to members with a GMP reaching SPA beyond 5 April 2021.  This is a permanent extension of the existing ‘interim solution’ that has applied to members with a GMP reaching SPA on or after 6 April 2016. Find out about the outcome of the GMP indexation consultation

The 2019 valuation assumption for GMP is that the Fund will pay limited increases for members that have reached SPA by 6 April 2016, with the government providing the remainder of the inflationary increase.  For members that reach SPA after this date, it is assumed that the Fund will be required to pay the entire inflationary increase.

Deficit recovery/surplus amortisation periods

Whilst one of the funding objectives is to build up sufficient assets to meet the cost of benefits as they accrue, it is recognised that at any particular point in time, the value of the accumulated assets will be different to the value of accrued liabilities, depending on how the actual experience of the Fund differs to the actuarial assumptions. This theory applies down to an individual employer level; each employer in the Fund has their own share of deficit or surplus attributable to their section of the Fund.

Where the valuation for an employer discloses a deficit then the level of required employer contributions includes an adjustment to fund the deficit over a period of 0 to 16 years.  The adjustment may be set either as a percentage of payroll or as a fixed monetary amount.

Where the valuation for an employer discloses a surplus then the level of required employer contribution may include an adjustment to amortise the surplus over an appropriate period.

The deficit recovery periods adopted at the 2019 valuation varied amongst individual employers.  Shorter recovery periods have been used where affordable.  This will provide a buffer for future adverse experience and reduce the interest cost paid by employers.  The deficit recovery period or amortisation period that is adopted for any particular employer will depend on:

  • The significance of the surplus or deficit relative to that employer’s liabilities
  • The covenant of the individual employer (including any security in place) and any limited period of participation in the Fund
  • The remaining contract length of an employer in the Fund (if applicable); and
  • The implications in terms of stability of future levels of employers’ contribution.

Where an employer's contribution has to increase significantly then, if appropriate, the increase may be phased in over a period not exceeding three years.

Pooling of individual employers

The policy of the Fund is that each individual employer should be responsible for the costs of providing pensions for its own employees who participate in the Fund. Accordingly, contribution rates are set for individual employers to reflect their own particular circumstances.

However, certain groups of individual employers are pooled for the purposes of determining contribution rates to recognise common characteristics or where the number of scheme members is small.

The funding pools adopted for the Fund at the 2019 valuation are summarised as:

  • Kent County Council
  • Colleges
  • Academies.

They are the type of pooling know as past and future service pooling. All employers in the pool pay the same total contribution rate and have the same funding level.

There are also a number of connected employers within the Fund. Connected employers are those where we understand that the organisation controls all of the employers or has responsibility for all the pension obligations. Examples include parent/subsidiaries or former Transferee Admission Bodies who have ceased to participate where the legacy liabilities have been passed back to the Letting Authority. In these instances, the contribution rate has been determined as a pooled rate.

The main purpose of pooling is to produce more stable employer contribution levels, although recognising that ultimately there will be some level of cross-subsidy of pension cost amongst pooled employers.

Forming or disbanding a funding pool

Where the Fund identifies a group of employers with similar characteristics and potential merits for pooling, it is possible to form a pool for these employers.  Advice should be sought from the Fund Actuary to consider the appropriateness and practicalities of forming the funding pool.

Conversely, the Fund may consider it no longer appropriate to pool a group of employers.  This could be due to divergence of previously similar characteristics or an employer becoming a dominant party in the pool (such that the results of the pool are largely driven by that dominant employer).  Where this scenario arises, advice should be sought from the Fund Actuary.

Funding pools should be monitored on a regular basis, at least at each actuarial valuation, in order to ensure the pooling arrangement remains appropriate.

Risk sharing

There are employers that participate in the Fund with a risk-sharing arrangement in place with another employer in the Fund.

For example, there are employers participating in the Fund with pass-through provisions: under this arrangement the pass-through employer does not take on the risk of underfunding as this risk remains with the letting authority or relevant guaranteeing employer.  When the pass-through employer ceases participation in the Fund, it is not responsible for making any exit payment, nor receiving any exit credit, as any deficit or surplus ultimately falls to the letting authority or relevant guaranteeing employer.

At the 2019 valuation, risk-sharing arrangements were allowed for by allocating any deficit/liabilities covered by the risk-sharing arrangement to the relevant responsible employer.

New employers joining the fund

When a new employer joins the Fund, the Fund Actuary is required to set the contribution rates payable by the new employer and allocate a share of Fund assets to the new employer as appropriate.  The most common types of new employers joining the Fund are admission bodies and new academies.  These are considered in more detail below.

Admission bodies

New admission bodies in the Fund are commonly a result of a transfer of staff from an existing employer in the Fund to another body (for example as part of a transfer of services from a council or academy to an external provider under Schedule 2 Part 3 of the Regulations).  Typically these transfers will be for a limited period (the contract length), over which the new admission body employer is required to pay contributions into the Fund in respect of the transferred members.

Funding at start of contract

Generally, when a new admission body joins the Fund, they will become responsible for all the pensions risk associated with the benefits accrued by transferring members and the benefits to be accrued over the contract length.  This is known as a full risk transfer.  In these cases, it may be appropriate that the new admission body is allocated a share of Fund assets equal to the value of the benefits transferred, i.e. the new admission body starts off on a fully funded basis.  This is calculated on the relevant funding basis and the opening position may be different when calculated on an alternative basis (for example, on an accounting basis).

However, there may be special arrangements made as part of the contract such that a full risk transfer approach is not adopted.  In these cases, the initial assets allocated to the new admission body will reflect the level of risk transferred and may therefore not be on a fully funded basis or may not reflect the full value of the benefits attributable to the transferring members.

Contribution rate

The contribution rate may be set on an open or a closed basis.  Where the funding at the start of the contract is on a fully funded basis then the contribution rate will represent the primary rate only; where there is a deficit allocated to the new admission body then the contribution rate will also incorporate a secondary rate with the aim of recovering the deficit over an appropriate recovery period.

Depending on the details of the arrangement, for example if any risk sharing arrangements are in place, then additional adjustments may be made to determine the contribution rate payable by the new admission body.  The approach in these cases will be bespoke to the individual arrangement.

Security

To mitigate the risk to the Fund that a new admission body will not be able to meet its obligations to the Fund in the future, the new admission body may be required to put in place a bond in accordance with Schedule 2 Part 3 of the Regulations, if required by the letting authority and administering authority.

If, for any reason, it is not desirable for a new admission body to enter into a bond, the new admission body may provide an alternative form of security which is satisfactory to the administering authority.

Risk sharing

Although a full risk transfer (as set out above) is most common, subject to agreement with the administering authority where required, new admission bodies and the relevant letting authority may make a commercial agreement to deal with the pensions risk differently.  For example, it may be agreed that all or part of the pensions risk remains with the letting authority.
Although pensions risk may be shared, it is common for the new admission body to remain responsible for pensions costs that arise from:

  • above average pay increases, including the effect on service accrued prior to contract commencement; and
  • redundancy and early retirement decisions.

The administering authority may consider risk-sharing arrangements as long as the approach is clearly documented in the admission agreement, the transfer agreement or any other side agreement.  The arrangement also should not lead to any undue risk to the other employers in the Fund.

Legal and actuarial advice in relation to risk-sharing arrangements should be sought where required.

New academies

When a school converts to academy status, the new academy (or the sponsoring multi-academy trust) becomes a Scheme employer in its own right.

Funding at start

On conversion to academy status, the new academy will become part of the Academies funding pool and will be allocated assets based on the funding level of the pool at the conversion date.

Contribution rate

The contribution rate payable when a new academy joins the Fund will be in line with the contribution rate certified for the Academies funding pool at the 2019 valuation.

Contribution reviews between actuarial valuations

It is anticipated for most scheme employers that the contribution rates certified at the formal actuarial valuation will remain payable for the period of the rates and adjustments certificate. However, there may be circumstances where a review of the contribution rates payable by an employer (or a group of employers) under Regulation 64A is deemed appropriate by the administering authority.

A contribution review may be requested by an employer or be required by the administering authority. Find out about the contribution review policy

The review may only take place if one of the following conditions are met:

  1. it appears likely to the administering authority that the amount of the liabilities arising or likely to arise has changed significantly since the last valuation
  2. it appears likely to the administering authority that there has been a significant change in the ability of the scheme employer or employers to meet the obligations of employers in the scheme; or
  3. a scheme employer or employers have requested a review of Scheme employer contributions and have undertaken to meet the costs of that review. A request under this condition can only be made if there has been a significant change in the liabilities arising or likely to arise and/or there has been a significant change in the ability of the scheme employer to meet its obligations to the Fund.

Guidance on the administering authority’s approach considering the appropriateness of a review and the process in which a review will be conducted is set out the Fund’s separate Contribution review policy. This includes details of the process that should be followed where an employer would like to request a review.

Once a review of contribution rates has been agreed, unless the impact of amending the contribution rates is deemed immaterial by the Fund Actuary, then the results of the review will be applied with effect from the agreed review date, regardless of the direction of change in the contribution rates.

Note that where a Scheme employer seems likely to exit the Fund before the next actuarial valuation then the administering authority can exercise its powers under Regulation 64(4) to carry out a review of contributions with a view to providing that assets attributable to the Scheme employer are equivalent to the exit payment that will be due from the Scheme employer. These cases do not fall under the separate contribution review policy.

With the exception of any cases falling under Regulation 64(4), the administering authority will not accept a request for a review of contributions where the effective date is within 12 months of the next rates and adjustments certificate.

Cessation valuations

When a Scheme employer exits the Fund and becomes an exiting employer, as required under the Regulations the Fund Actuary will be asked to carry out an actuarial valuation in order to determine the liabilities in respect of the benefits held by the exiting employer’s current and former employees.  The Fund Actuary is also required to determine the exit payment due from the exiting employer to the Fund or the exit credit payable from the Fund to the exiting employer.

Any deficit in the Fund in respect of the exiting employer will be due to the Fund as a single lump sum payment, unless it is agreed by the administering authority and the other parties involved that an alternative approach is permissible.  For example:

  • It may be agreed with the administering authority that the exit payment can be spread over some agreed period
  • the assets and liabilities relating to the employer may transfer within the Fund to another participating employer, or
  • the employer’s exit may be deferred subject to agreement with the administering authority, for example if it intends to offer Scheme membership to a new employee within the following three years.

Similarly, any surplus in the Fund in respect of the exiting employer may be treated differently to a payment of an exit credit, subject to the agreement between the relevant parties and any legal documentation.

In assessing the value of the liabilities attributable to the exiting employer, the Fund Actuary may adopt differing approaches depending on the employer and the specific details surrounding the employer’s cessation scenario.

Exit credit policy

Under advice from MHCLG, administering authorities should set out their exit credit policy in their Funding Strategy Statement. Having regard to any relevant considerations, the administering authority will take the following approach to the payment of exit credits:

  • Any employer who cannot demonstrate that they have been exposed to underfunding risk during their participation in the Fund will not be entitled to an exit credit payment. This will include the majority of “pass-through” arrangements. This is on the basis that these employers would not been asked to pay an exit payment had a deficit existed at the time of exit.
  • The administering authority does not need to enquire into the precise risk sharing arrangement adopted by an employer but it must be satisfied that the risk sharing arrangement has been in place before it will pay out an exit credit. The level of risk that an employer has borne will be taken into account when determining the amount of any exit credit. It is the responsibility of the exiting employer to set out in writing why the arrangements make payment of an exit credit appropriate.
  • Any exit credit payable will be subject to a maximum of the actual employer contributions paid into the Fund.
  • As detailed above, the Fund Actuary may adopt differing approaches depending on the employer the specific details surrounding the employer’s cessation scenario. The default approach to calculating the cessation position will be on a minimum-risk basis unless it can be shown that there is another employer in the Fund who will take on financial responsibility for the liabilities in the future. If the administering authority is satisfied that there is another employer willing to take on responsibility for the liabilities (or that there is some other form of guarantee in place) then the cessation position may be calculated on the ongoing/long-term funding basis.
  • The administering authority will pay out any exit credits within six months of the cessation date where possible. A longer time may be agreed between the administering authority and the exiting employer where necessary. For example if the employer does not provide all the relevant information to the administering authority within one month of the cessation date the administering authority will not be able to guarantee payment within six months of the cessation date.
  • Under the Regulations, the administering authority has the discretion to take into account any other relevant factors in the calculation of any exit credit payable and they will seek legal advice where appropriate.

Managing exit payments

Where a cessation valuation reveals a deficit and an exit payment is due, the expectation is that the employer settles this debt immediately through a single cash payment. However, should it not be possible for the employer to settle this amount, providing the employer puts forward sufficient supporting evidence to the administering authority, the administering authority may agree a deferred debt agreement (DDA) with the employer under Regulation 64(7A) or a debt spreading agreement (DSA) under Regulation 64B. Read Kent's deferred debt and debt spreading agreement policies (PDF, 240.6 KB)

Under a DDA, the exiting employer becomes a deferred employer in the Fund (i.e. they remain as a Scheme employer but with no active members) and remains responsible for paying the secondary rate of contributions to fund their deficit. The secondary rate of contributions will be reviewed at each actuarial valuation until the termination of the agreement.

Under a DSA, the cessation debt is crystallised and spread over a period deemed reasonable by the administering authority having regard to the views of the Fund Actuary.

Whilst a DSA involves crystallising the cessation debt and the employer’s only obligation is to settle this set amount, in a DDA the employer remains in the Fund as a Scheme employer and is exposed to the same risks (unless agreed otherwise with the administering authority) as active employers in the Fund (e.g. investment, interest rate, inflation, longevity and regulatory risks) meaning that the deficit will change over time.

Guidance on the administering authority’s policy for entering into, monitoring and terminating a DDA or DSA is set out in the Fund’s separate DSA and DDA policies document. This includes details of when a DDA or a DSA may be permitted and the information required from the employer when putting forward a request for a DDA or DSA.

Regulatory factors

At the date of drafting this FSS, the government is currently consulting on potential changes to the Regulations, some which may affect the regulations surrounding an employer’s exit from the Fund.  This is set out in the Local government pension scheme: changes to the local valuation cycle and the management of employer risk consultation document.

Further details of this can be found in the Regulatory risks section below.

Bulk transfers

Bulk transfers of staff into or out of the Fund can take place from other LGPS Funds or non-LGPS Funds.  In either case, the Fund Actuary for both Funds will be required to negotiate the terms for the bulk transfer – specifically the terms by which the value of assets to be paid from one Fund to the other is calculated.

The agreement will be specific to the situation surrounding each bulk transfer but in general the Fund will look to receive the bulk transfer on no less than a fully funded transfer (i.e. the assets paid from the ceding Fund are sufficient to cover the value of the liabilities on the agreed basis).

A bulk transfer may be required by an issued Direction Order.  This is generally in relation to an employer merger, where all the assets and liabilities attributable to the transferring employer in its original Fund are transferred to the receiving Fund.

Consolidation of Multi Academy Trusts (MATs)

Where an academy is transferring into or out of the Fund as part of a MAT consolidation exercise, the Fund generally expects that this will proceed through a Direction Order from the Secretary of State. In these situations, and subject to the terms agreed between the Fund Actuary to both LGPS Funds, typically all the assets attributable to the academy in the ceding Fund are transferred to the receiving Fund.

Where the academy is transferring out of the Fund, the Fund requires a Direction Order to be sought such that all associated deferred and pensioner liabilities are also transferred out of the Fund.

Where the academy is transferring into the Fund, where appropriate, the academy will become part of the Fund’s Academy pool. If the funding level of the transfer into the Fund is substantially lower than the funding level of the academy pool then the Fund may require additional contributions to be paid by the academy to protect the other academies in the pool from an increased funding cost as a result of the transfer terms. There may be some instances where it is not deemed appropriate for the academy to join the Academy pool, or at least not immediately. For example, if a large number of academies from a MAT transfer into the Fund at one time, then it may be more appropriate to initiate a separate funding pool for these academies until their funding position is in line with the main Academy pool, at which point it can then be merged into the Academy pool.

Links with the Investment Strategy Statement (ISS)

The main link between the Funding Strategy Statement (FSS) and the ISS relates to the discount rate that underlies the funding strategy as set out in the FSS, and the expected rate of investment return which is expected to be achieved by the long-term investment strategy as set out in the ISS.

As explained above, the ongoing discount rate that is adopted in the actuarial valuation is derived by considering the expected return from the long-term investment strategy. This ensures consistency between the funding strategy and investment strategy.

Risks and counter measures

Whilst the funding strategy attempts to satisfy the funding objectives of ensuring sufficient assets to meet pension liabilities and stable levels of employer contributions, it is recognised that there are risks that may impact on the funding strategy and hence the ability of the strategy to meet the funding objectives.

The major risks to the funding strategy are financial, although there are other external risk factors including:

  • demographic
  • regulatory, and
  • employer risks.

Financial risks

The main financial risk is that the actual investment strategy fails to produce the expected rate of investment return (in real terms) that underlies the funding strategy. This could be due to a number of factors, including market returns being less than expected and/or the fund managers who are employed to implement the chosen investment strategy failing to achieve their performance targets.

The valuation results are most sensitive to the real discount rate (i.e. the difference between the discount rate assumption and the price inflation assumption).  Broadly speaking an increase/decrease of 0.5% p.a. in the real discount rate will decrease/increase the valuation of the liabilities by 10%, and decrease/increase the required employer contribution by around 2.5% of payroll p.a.

However, the Investment and Pension Fund Committee regularly monitors the investment returns achieved by the fund managers and receives advice from the independent advisers and officers on investment strategy.

The Committee may also seek advice from the Fund Actuary on valuation related matters.

In addition, the Fund Actuary provides funding updates between valuations to check whether the funding strategy continues to meet the funding objectives

Demographic risks

Allowance is made in the funding strategy via the actuarial assumptions for a continuing improvement in life expectancy.  However, the main demographic risk to the funding strategy is that it might underestimate the continuing improvement in longevity.  For example, an increase of one year to life expectancy of all members in the Fund will increase the liabilities by approximately 4%.

The actual mortality of pensioners in the Fund is monitored by the Fund Actuary at each actuarial valuation and assumptions are kept under review.  For the past two funding valuations, the Fund has commissioned a bespoke longevity analysis by Barnett Waddingham’s specialist longevity team in order to assess the mortality experience of the Fund and help set an appropriate mortality assumption for funding purposes.

The liabilities of the Fund can also increase by more than has been planned as a result of the additional financial costs of early retirements and ill-health retirements.  However, the administering authority monitors the incidence of early retirements; and procedures are in place that require individual employers to pay additional amounts into the Fund to meet any additional costs arising from early retirements.

Maturity risk

The maturity of a Fund (or of an employer in the Fund) is an assessment of how close on average the members are to retirement (or already retired).  The more mature the Fund or employer, the greater proportion of its membership that is near or in retirement.  For a mature Fund or employer, the time available to generate investment returns is shorter and therefore the level of maturity needs to be considered as part of setting funding and investment strategies.

The cashflow profile of the Fund needs to be considered alongside the level of maturity: as a Fund matures, the ratio of active to pensioner members falls, meaning the ratio of contributions being paid into the Fund to the benefits being paid out of the Fund also falls.  This therefore increases the risk of the Fund having to sell assets in order to meets its benefit payments.

The government has published a consultation (Local government pension scheme: changes to the local valuation cycle and management of employer risk) which may affect the Fund’s exposure to maturity risk.  More information on this can be found in the Regulatory risks section below

Regulatory risks

The benefits provided by the scheme and employee contribution levels are set out in regulations determined by central government. The tax status of the invested assets is also determined by the government.

The funding strategy is therefore exposed to the risks of changes in the regulations governing the scheme and changes to the tax regime which may affect the cost to individual employers participating in the scheme.

However, the administering authority participates in any consultation process of any proposed changes in regulations and seeks advice from the Fund Actuary on the financial implications of any proposed changes.

There are a number of general risks to the Fund and the LGPS, including:

  • If the LGPS was to be discontinued in its current form it is not known what would happen to members’ benefits.
  • The potential effects of GMP equalisation between males and females, if implemented, are not yet known.
  • More generally, as a statutory scheme the benefits provided by the LGPS or the structure of the scheme could be changed by the government.
  • The State Pension Age is due to be reviewed by the government in the next few years.

At the time of preparing this FSS, specific regulatory risks of particular interest to the LGPS are in relation to the McCloud/Sargeant judgements, the cost cap mechanism and the timing of future funding valuations consultation.  These are discussed in the sections below.

McCloud/Sargeant judgements and cost cap

The 2016 national Scheme valuation was used to determine the results of HM Treasury’s (HMT) employer cost cap mechanism for the first time.  The HMT cost cap mechanism was brought in after Lord Hutton’s review of public service pensions with the aim of providing protection to taxpayers and employees against unexpected changes (expected to be increases) in pension costs.  The cost control mechanism only considers “member costs”.  These are the costs relating to changes in assumptions made to carry out valuations relating to the profile of the Scheme members; e.g. costs relating to how long members are expected to live for and draw their pension.

Therefore, assumptions such as future expected levels of investment returns and levels of inflation are not included in the calculation, so have no impact on the cost management outcome.

The 2016 HMT cost cap valuation revealed a fall in these costs and therefore a requirement to enhance scheme benefits from 1 April 2019.  However, as a funded scheme, the LGPS also had a cost cap mechanism controlled by the Scheme Advisory Board (SAB) in place and HMT allowed SAB to put together a package of proposed benefit changes in order for the LGPS to no longer breach the HMT cost cap.  These benefit changes were due to be consulted on with all stakeholders and implemented from 1 April 2019.

However, on 20 December 2018 there was a judgement made by the Court of Appeal which resulted in the government announcing their decision to pause the cost cap process across all public service schemes.  This was in relation to two employment tribunal cases which were brought against the government in relation to possible discrimination in the implementation of transitional protection following the introduction of the reformed 2015 public service pension schemes from 1 April 2015.  Transitional protection enabled some members to remain in their pre-2015 schemes after 1 April 2015 until retirement or the end of a pre-determined tapered protection period.  The claimants challenged the transitional protection arrangements on the grounds of direct age discrimination, equal pay and indirect gender and race discrimination.

The first case (McCloud) relating to the Judicial Pension Scheme was ruled in favour of the claimants, while the second case (Sargeant) in relation to the Fire scheme was ruled against the claimants.  Both rulings were appealed and as the two cases were closely linked, the Court of Appeal decided to combine the two cases.  In December 2018, the Court of Appeal ruled that the transitional protection offered to some members as part of the reforms amounts to unlawful discrimination.  On 27 June 2019 the Supreme Court denied the government’s request for an appeal in the case.  A remedy is still to be either imposed by the Employment Tribunal or negotiated and applied to all public service schemes, so it is not yet clear how this judgement may affect LGPS members’ past or future service benefits.  It has, however, been noted by government in its 15 July 2019 statement that it expects to have to amend all public service schemes, including the LGPS.

On 16 July 2020, the government published a consultation on the proposed remedy to be applied to LGPS benefits and at the same time announced the unpausing of the 2016 cost cap process which will take into account the remedy for the McCloud and Sargeant judgement. On 13 May 2021 the government issued a ministerial statement which confirms that changes will be made to the LGPS Regulations to compensate members directly affected by the change to career average benefits from 1 April 2014. The government’s intention is that revised regulations will come into force on 1 April 2023, and draft regulations are expected later in 2021.

Consultation: Local government pension scheme: changes to the local valuation cycle and management of employer risk

On 8 May 2019, the government published a consultation seeking views on policy proposals to amend the rules of the LGPS in England and Wales.  The consultation covered:

  • amendments to the local fund valuations from the current three year (triennial) to a four year (quadrennial) cycle
  • a number of measures aimed at mitigating the risks of moving from a triennial to a quadrennial cycle
  • proposals for flexibility on exit payments
  • proposals for further policy changes to exit credits; and
  • proposals for changes to the employers required to offer LGPS membership.

The consultation is currently ongoing: the consultation was closed to responses on 31 July 2019 and an outcome is now awaited.

So far, two partial responses to the consultation have been issued:

  1. On 27 February 2020, a partial response was issued relating to policy changes to exit credits
  2. On 26 August 2020, a partial response was issued relating to review of employer contributions and flexibility on exit payments.

This FSS has been updated in light of these responses and will be revisited again once the outcomes are known for the remaining items.

Detail of the outstanding policy proposals are outlined below:

Timing of future actuarial valuations

LGPS valuations currently take place on a triennial basis which results in employer contributions being reviewed every three years.  In September 2018 it was announced by the Chief Secretary to HMT, Elizabeth Truss, that the national Scheme valuation would take place on a quadrennial basis (i.e. every four years) along with the other public sector pension schemes.  These results of the national Scheme valuation are used to test the cost control cap mechanism and HMT believed that all public sector scheme should have the cost cap test happen at the same time with the next quadrennial valuation in 2020 and then 2024.

Changes to employers required to offer LGPS membership

At the time of drafting this FSS, under the current Regulations further education corporations, sixth form college corporations and higher education corporations in England and Wales are required to offer membership of the LGPS to their non-teaching staff.

With consideration of the nature of the LGPS and the changes in nature of the further education and higher education sectors, the government has proposed to remove the requirement for further education corporations, sixth form college corporations and higher education corporations in England to offer new employees access to the LGPS.  As these types of employer participate in the Fund, this could impact on the level of maturity of the Fund and the cashflow profile.  For example, increased risk of contribution income being insufficient to meet benefit outgo, if not in the short term then in the long term as the payroll in respect of these types of employers decreases with fewer and fewer active members participating in the Fund.

This also brings an increased risk to the Fund in relation to these employers becoming exiting employers in the Fund.  Should they decide not to admit new members to the Fund, the active membership attributable to the employers will gradually reduce to zero, triggering an exit under the Regulations and a potential significant exit payment.  This has the associated risk of the employer not being able to meet the exit payment and thus the exit payment falling to the other employers in the Fund

Employer risks

Many different employers participate in the Fund. Accordingly, it is recognised that a number of employer-specific events could impact on the funding strategy including

  • structural changes in an individual employer’s membership
  • an individual employer deciding to close the scheme to new employees
  • an employer ceasing to exist without having fully funded their pension liabilities.

However, the administering authority monitors the position of employers participating in the Fund, particularly those which may be susceptible to the events outlined, and takes advice from the Fund Actuary when required.

In addition, the administering authority keeps in close touch with all individual employers participating in the Fund to ensure that, as administering authority, it has the most up to date information available on individual employer situations. It also keeps individual employers briefed on funding and related issues.

Governance risks

Accurate data is necessary to ensure that members ultimately receive their correct benefits.  The administering authority is responsible for keeping data up to date and results of the actuarial valuation depend on accurate data.  If incorrect data is valued then there is a risk that the contributions paid are not adequate to cover the cost of the benefits accrued.

Monitoring and review

This FSS is reviewed formally, in consultation with the key parties, at least every three years to tie in with the triennial actuarial valuation process.

The most recent valuation was carried out as at 31 March 2019, certifying the contribution rates payable by each employer in the Fund for the period from 1 April 2020 to 31 March 2023.

The timing of the next funding valuation is due to be confirmed as part of the government’s Local government pension scheme: changes to the local valuation cycle and management of employer risk consultation which closed on 31 July 2019.  At the time of drafting this FSS, it is anticipated that the next funding valuation will be due as at 31 March 2022 but the period for which contributions will be certified remains unconfirmed.

The administering authority also monitors the financial position of the Fund between actuarial valuations and may review the FSS more frequently if necessary.

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